After bossing Berlin, The Brew are set to debut latest album in Oxford

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There aren’t too many bands nowadays that get to release six albums.

Also, there aren’t too many trios in particular that can defend the reputation of being a tirelessly touring excellent live-act, all of which while maintaining the original line-up. No, The Brew, hailing from the northern english coastal town of Grimsby are unique and they step back onto the scene with their new album, Shake The Tree which they will be debuting at The Bullingdon’s Haven Club February 1 in Oxford.

As with its predecessor Control, Smith, Smith and Barwick relied on the fruitful collaboration with Toby Jepson and Veil Studios. And their brand of modern Rock with psychedelic touches is in good hands with him. Over the course of a month they crafted ten songs that comprise this sixth album that has effectively outgrown any comparisons.

One can hear that great parts of this album were recorded while standing up. THE BREW don’t stray too far from home – the stage that is – on this production. Why should they? This trio is so tight a unit of impressive players that tracking and overdubs would only dilute their flawless delivery.

The opening track Johnny Moore sets the tone for the album: straight forward Rock n’ Roll music and a Jason Barwick on top of his game! And that is what Shake The Tree is about, it is an open invitation to do just that until the fruit falls down, to take matters into your own hands, in short an ode to life and living itself. Without allowing any respite, Knife Edge rolls right over you and the title track Shake The Tree essentially sums up the optimistic thread running through the record: every dog has its day, or no cow-town should hold you back from dreaming big. The Brew do set an example of sorts, Bassist Tim Smith grants some realistic representation to Sasha Baron Cohens depiction of his hometown in his homonymous comedy-film.

Small Town Faces captures this alienation of having a head full of ideas, yet being seemingly trapped in an environment where everybody just appears to be vegetating. And wasn’t music always the best way out of such misery? The Brew are the Ambassador so to speak, the messenger that you are not alone, that there is a world full of like-minded people. And who should know better than The Brew? See?

As with the predecessor The Brew present an album from the same mould thematically, while further exploring the seemingly limited trio line-up. The Smith family supports Barwick’s demanding and mature vocals with tasteful and effective backings, The Brew have long proven that big stages are right up their alley.

Shake The Tree is definitely an electric album, the scarce acoustic moments featured on “Control” are purposefully being left out. The guitars roar with fuzz and wah, wailing on a solid carpet provided by Kurtis Smith’s muscular drumming style. Here and there one can sense an epic extended jam lurking within the short kept songs.

Their steadlily growing fanbase can look forward in excitement to these songs getting the live-treatment. Speaking of fans, it is the tight bond between the group and their brewligans that in part enabled this record in the first place: the crowdfunding campaign initiated on pledgemusic.com was exceeded expectations and the resulting record is the hard-working musicians’ and of the bargain. But foremost, Shake The Tree proves that this band remains hungry on their sixth release. Tim Smith might say it best: it takes ten years to become an overnight sensation.

The Brew embody paradox opposites it seems. They are young veterans, equipped with the enthusiasm of newcomers. So treat yourself and buy the album, go see them live and shake the tree!

For further information, and to purchase tickets, click here.

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